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TROUBLE WITH TEACHERS

Author: Helen Orme

Illustrator: Cathy Brett and Anna Torborg

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Publisher: Ransom Publishing Ltd,

Material: paperback

Summary: The Sisters are at it again, this time escorting a visiting author around the school. They have a lot of responsibility to make sure the school has a “good image,” but they keep running into trouble ... trouble with a capital T as in trouble with the teacher. Between fights and kissing in the hall, it’s hard to find a “safe” avenue to escort the honored guest. Inspiration wins in the end. This is a chapter book series for reluctant readers (reading at ages 7-8).

Type of Reading: family reading, read aloud book, remedial reader, learning to read, short chapter

Recommended Age: read together: 7 to 10; read yourself: 9 to 12

Interest Level: 7 to 10

Age of Child: Read by a 10-year-old girl.

Young Reader Reaction: The “Brit” slang that appears occasionally in this text was hard for my reader to “get” sometimes. She did, as a reluctant reader, like the fact that the book was a quick read (only 36 pages and most of those have an illustration in addition to the text).

Adult Reader Reaction: I have trouble following the dialogue in this series at times; it seems to jerk along, sometimes too quick, sometimes too slow. It does address a common theme most kids experience in school: trouble with teachers.

Pros: This is a book that addresses a common theme for adolescents and reflects their outlook, which sometimes can lead to less than the best decision-making under the guise of “doing what’s right.” It also highlights one of the best parts of education, having real “live” people come in and share their craft.

Cons: The book doesn’t paint the “sisters” in a particularly responsible light, but rather shows them being less than responsible with their duties as “tour guides.” It also shows adults “letting them off the hook” which I’m not sure I agree with. This is definitely a girl book, and that could be a pro or con.

Borrow or Buy: I wouldn’t borrow or buy this book. Under the pretext of being a simpler read, I found the text a bit too skeletal. Maybe kids who struggle with reading might think differently since it is formatted with less text on the page and somewhat controlled vocabulary.

If You Liked This Book, Try: Middle School Blues by Lou Kassam ANNIE: THE MYSTERIOUS MORGAN HORSE   THE BOY ON THE WOODEN BOX; How the Impossible Became Possible . . . on Schindler's List   TO KEEP THE SOUTH MANITOU LIGHT

Educational Themes: If you have an author visiting your school, you may want to read this ahead of time, especially if you have student ambassadors escorting your guest around. The theme could also be used as a writing prompt if your students have never had an author come to their school.

Literary Categories: Fiction - friendship, easy reader series

Date(s) Reviewed: December 2007

Other Reviews: No Critics' Reviews or reader feedback found at bn.com (Barnes & Noble) or borders.com. We’re interested in your review. Please enter your Name (and blog in Parenthesis), then copy/paste your post link in the URL field. With a link exchange, we both benefit because interested readers can visit you too!




                 

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